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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
's mayor michael hancock. good morning. >> good morning, chris. >> this is the only debate specifically geared to domestic issues. what based on your conversations with other mayors do these people want to hear from the candidates and they need to address tomorrow night? >> i think it's very important. i believe as we heard in the past, you're going to see and hear two fundamental differences as far as genders are concerned with regard to the american people. the american people want to hear about the issues that matter most to them. those are the issues around jobs, the economy, safety in america. their children and education. the things that really meet the american people where they are. that's why we are also here today and the next 30, 45 minutes where u.s. mayors will get together and talk about those very important issues, as well. >> unemployment in your state is above the national average, about 8.2% now. >> right. >> you criticized president obama during the convention for pressuring governor romney to release his tax returns, saying that wasn't the issue that mattered the mos
and box your opponent in. >> we'll see if there's a clear winner. thank you very much, michael. thank you, chris. it's always a pleasure. >>> a huge victory for democrats in pennsylvania in a hard-fought battle against that state's new voter i.d. law for now. a judge in the past few hours blocked the law from goalkeeper into effect. judge simpson ordered the sat not to enforce the voter i.d. requirement in this year's election, but it will go into full effect next year. opponents of the law say it would hurt voter turnover, especially among minorities and the leeld he who are likely to vote for democrats in that state. it was in june that a top state republican lawmaker predicted the law would help governor romney. >> which is going to allow governor romney to win the state of pennsylvania, done. >> and joining us now, judith brown, diana's co-director of the advancement project, a civil rights organization that filed the lawsuit. thank you for your time. we played that state lawmaker who said if that law was in effect in pennsylvania, he felt that governor romney would win that state, do
of nato special operations headquarters. let's hear now from michael in stat on lay in a on the republican line. >> caller: thank you for listening. >> host: yes, go ahead, michael. >> caller: it is astonishing to me why we don't put the support behind turkey since turkey supported us. i cannot understand why we don't go in, full guns, and support of ally. that is all i have to say. >> guest: well, michael. we actually have -- the united states has strong support for turkey since clinton and their foreign minister in turkey consulted earlier this week in refons the shelling that cross border shelling into turkey on wednesday. the u.s. strongly supported the meeting of the nato council that reassured turkey that defense commitments from the other members of the alliance were still firm and includes the united states. the u.s. has all along supported and very closely ashrined with turkish policy with regard to the regime and the need for asad to go and end repression. the problem is, that neath are the turks or the united states have been able to, don't have any leverage on assadand no able
. in 1988, michael dukakis could have had help not looking so cold in his response. >> we have a professor at the george washington university, john sides. when you have those moments that reinforce a marriage, either good or for ill, to a candidate, how important or damaging can these be? >> candidate debates in a general election to not move the polls a general -- a lot. race.in a close debat in general, i think these dramatic moments in debates are not necessarily game changes for the average american voter. >> you wrote, usually the candidates fight to a drawl. . it is hard in that context to have a stunning victory or a terrible defeat. can you elaborate? >> the candidates spend a lot of time trying to lower their expectations about the performance and portray the other person as this great orator . in reality, the candidates spend a lot of time prepping for the debates and they are very good at it. they have read a lot of material and memorize a lot of material. in that context, it is hard for a candidate to really make a big enough mistake to actually swing opinion too strongly to h
and inexperience. >> reporter: in the next election, democratic candidate michael dukakis is asked this controversial question in his debate with vice president george bush. >> governor, if kitty dukakis were raped and murdered, would you favor an irrevocable death penalty for the killer? >> no, i don't, bernard, i think you know i oppose the death penalty during all of my life. >> reporter: the public sees his answer as cold and dispassionate. and that very night his poll numbers dropped. during the 1988 vice presidential debate, republican senator dan quayle's comparison of john f. kennedy elicits this blistering response from his opponent. >> senator, you're no jack kennedy. >> reporter: body language plays a part in the presidential debate in 1992, george h.w. bush deliberately looks at his watch and pays for it when the audience and voters see it as disrespectful. >> there are differences. >> reporter: body language makes a difference in a debate between al gore and george w. bush as well. gore sighs over and over again and bush surprises by winning the debate and the election
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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